Theatre

Santi & Naz

Santi and Naz have been sahelis (best friends) from birth. It is 1947 and India is on the brink of Partition. Families are being torn apart, social unrest and violence are spreading, but the girls are more interested in playing marbles, competing to see who can make the best rope swing, and spying on Rahul at the local nimbu stall. When Naz is betrothed to Nadeem, a tailor in Rawalpindi, circumstances threaten to separate the girls forever; will it be sanctuary or saheli? How far will they go to avoid the inevitable?

The piece is experiment in collaborative creation
Santi & Naz premiered (work-in-progress sharing) at
Derby Theatre’s In Good Company Scratch That Itch, June 2017 and then
Scratch at the Jack at Brockley Jack Studio Theatre

 

Development of the piece continues.

 

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Coconut at Script Accelerator

After a month of R&D at Park Theatre, as part of Script Accelerator the Coconut team are headed to New Diorama to continue exploration of the text and character journeys.

Here is some feedback from the 2 performances of a 20 minute extract of work-in-progress:

“The writer really has potential and I like her organic political wit and natural comedy….The script has a good premise, I think it really needs to look at the structure of how to tell that story. And maybe go for the comedy and ridiculousness a bit more.” 

“This is great – funny, characters you want to spend time with, moving towards a troubling end”

More feedback to come!

Rumi : Sukh Kaur Ojla
Simon: Karl Sedgwick

Coconut

Coconut started life as a short monologue as part of Ladylogue! 2014

It is now in development with The Thelmas as a full-length piece and is being supported by Park Theatre and New Diorama Theatre. There will be a public sharing of the work-in-progress at Park Theatre in November.

Rumi is a coconut. That’s a term for someone who is brown on the outside and white on the inside. She’s looking for her one true love, and hopes that he might be a coconut too. After a disastrous halal speed dating event Rumi meets Simon, who might not be brown, but he’s more than willing to get on board with brown stuff. Plus he’s super cute, so they are soon married.

Rumi continues to be proud of her pseudo Muslim husband who loves curry and greets her grandparents in the traditional way. But then he starts hanging out with the Immam when she’s not there and he’s commenting on what she wears, and how much she drinks. When Simon asks to be known as Syeed alarm bells start to ring for Rumi. Simon, sorry Syeed, starts spending more and more time away from home, taking secret phone calls at inappropriate moments. He says he’s going to the Mosque to pray, Rumi thinks he’s having an affair.

When Syeed’s face appears on Rumi’s television she realises she is just another Jihadi wife, the exact opposite of all that she’d wanted. Rumi is left to pick up the pieces of her marriage, her reputation and attempts to explore exactly what drove Simon to such extremes.

Sukh Ojla as Rumi in the original monologue at Tristan Bates Theatre, August 2014

We are looking to partner with organisations who are focused on the themes of the play- radicalisation and extremism. The play will have an accompanying educational programme and workshop.